06
February
2015
|
03:40 AM
America/Chicago

2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book scheduled to release March 4

The KIDS COUNT Data Book is an annual publication that assesses child well-being nationally and across the 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Using an index of 16 indicators, the 2014 report ranks states on overall child well-being and in four domains: (1) economic well-being, (2) education, (3) health, and (4) family and community. The report also provides national trends, comparing the latest data with mid-decade statistics.
 
The 2015 Data Book is the 26th edition of the Annie E. Casey Foundation's signature publication. The report also examines trends in child well-being since 1990, the year of the first report. It highlights positive policies and practices that have improved child health and development and features stories from several states on advocacy efforts that have improved outcomes for kids and families.
 
Methodist Healthcare Ministries of South Texas, Inc. has joined forces with the Center for Public Policy Priorities, an independent public policy organization, to release the 2015 Data Book.
Join legislators, legislative staff members, community leaders, child advocates, service providers, local elected officials and more in Austin on March 4 for a breakfast briefing and presentation of the report.

The event is free and open to the public, and attendees will receive a complimentary copy of the new report. Continental breakfast will be served. To register for the State of Texas Children Report Release, click here.
 
About the Center for Public Policy Priorities
 
The Center for Public Policy Priorities is an independent public policy organization that uses data and analysis to advocate for solutions that enable Texans of all backgrounds
to reach their full potential. For more information, visit http://www.forabettertexas.org.
 
About The Anne E. Casey Foundation
 
The Annie E. Casey Foundation is devoted to developing a brighter future for millions of children at risk of poor educational, economic, social and health outcomes. For more information, visit http://www.aecf.org